UCL/British Psychological Society History of the Psychological Disciplines Seminar Series

Monday 24th March
 
Dr. Mike Jay
 
Over the Edge: William Sargant and the Battle for the Mind
 
In his bestselling book of 1957, Battle for the Mind, the psychiatrist William Sargant revealed to the public the secret techniques that had been used to manipulate humanity, in his words, ‘from the Stone Age to Hitler’. His ideas were adopted by public intellectuals including Robert Graves, Aldous Huxley and Bertrand Russell.
 
Sargant’s theory was perhaps the most potent manifestation of postwar psychiatry in British popular culture, both drawing on and contributing to its aura of power and expertise. He presented a stark image of a modern world that had outgrown religious consolation but was not yet rational enough to resist the forms of control that were replacing it.
 
Organiser: Professor Sonu Shamdasani (UCL)
 
Time: 6pm to 7.30 pm.
 
Location:  Arts and Humanities Common Room (G24), Foster Court, Malet Place, University College London.
 
From the Torrington Place entrance to UCL, enter the campus on Malet Place. After fifty metres, you will find Foser court on the right hand side. Turn right under the underpass, and enter via the second door on the right. The common room is straight ahead.

UCL/British Psychological Society History of the Psychological Disciplines Seminar Series, Monday 25th November

Dr. Andreas Sommer (Cambridge)

 The last Romantic? Carl du Prel (1839-1899) and the Formation of German Experimental Psychology

 Although the philosopher Carl du Prel was arguably the most popular German-language theorist of the unconscious mind immediately preceding Sigmund Freud, his work has received remarkably little attention in histories of the mind sciences. Revered by artists such as Rilke and Kandinsky, du Prel was read by psychologists like William James, Frederic W. H. Myers, Carl Gustav Jung and Freud, who referred to the philosopher in ‘The Interpretation of Dreams’ as “that brilliant mystic”. Taken up and advanced by Frederic W. H. Myers and Edmund Gurney in England, du Prel’s integrative psychological research programme became a competing brand of German physiological psychology and significantly informed the psychological methodologies of William James in the US and Théodore Flournoy in Switzerland. Sketching the formation and reception of du Prel’s ideas, this talk will reconstruct the hardening of epistemological and methodological boundaries of German experimental psychology, partly in response to his radical research programme. Through a discussion of the cultural and political backdrop of late-nineteenth century German science, it also hopes to shed light on factors for the curious neglect of du Prel and his ideas in conventional histories of psychology.

 Organiser: Professor Sonu Shamdasani (UCL)

 Time: 6pm to 7.30 pm.

 Location:

Arts and Humanities Common Room (G24), Foster Court, Malet Place, University College London. From the Torrington Place entrance to UCL, enter the campus on Malet Place. After fifty metres, you will find Foser court on the right hand side. Turn right under the underpass, and enter via the second door on the right. The common room is straight ahead.

 

Seminar, 11th November 2013

Monday 11th November:Dr. Sushrut Jadhav (UCL)

UCL/British Psychological Society History of the Psychological Disciplines Seminar Series

Seminal Matters: Historical Erasures and Category Errors Concerning Semen Regulation

This seminar is in two parts:

The first part will present evidence to argue that the history of semen related disorders, currently classified as an unique and exotic mental condition amongst South Asians, is deeply flawed as it erases a significant body of western literature. As a result, the phenomena of semen loss is classified it as a South Asian Culture Bound Mental Disorder in the International Classification of Diseases (F48.8, ICD-10).

The second part will demonstrate findings from an experiment that reveals how such diagnoses can be equally constructed amongst White Britons in London. The seminar will conclude by 1) arguing these are key concerns glossed over by global mental health models that abstract local explanations of suffering to the level of a psychopathology, and 2) proposing the term ‘cultural iatrogenesis’ as a new category to be included in the classification of mental disorders.

Organiser: Professor Sonu Shamdasani (UCL)

Time: 6pm to 7.30 pm.

Note Location:
Arts and Humanities Common Room (G24), Foster Court, Malet Place, University College London.

From the Torrington Place entrance to UCL, enter the campus on Malet Place. After fifty metres, you will find Foser court on the right hand side. Turn right under the underpass, and enter via the second door on the right. The common room is straight ahead.

Jung History Conference, 30th November 2013

Arts and Humanities Common Room (G24), Foster Court, Malet Place, University College London

To register, please visit ucljunghistoryconference.eventbrite.co.uk

 

11-11.15 Introduction

 

11.15-12.00 Sonu Shamdasani “English Modernist Writers as Readers of Jung”

 

12.15-1.00 Gaia Domenici, “Books ‘For All and None’: ZarathustraThe Red Bookand ‘Visionary’ Works”

 

2.30-3.15 Christopher Wagner, “Jung’s Alchemy: The Concept and Uses of the Quaternity.”

 

3.15-4.00 Vicente de Moura, “The case of Maggy Reichstein – Jung’s Quest and Eastern Psychology.”

 

4.30-5.15 Matei Iagher, “The Sun and the Blue Sky: C.G. Jung and Mircea Eliade on religion.”

 

5.15-6.00 Martin Liebscher, “With Queen Vaidehi to the Pure Land: Jung’s reading of the

Amitāyur-dhyāna-sūtra.”

 

Cost: £45

Registered Student (bring proof of ID): £30

UCL staff/student: free

 

For further details, see www.ucl.ac.uk/cehp/chpd/conferences

Contact Sonu Shamdasani, s.shamdasani@ucl.ac.uk

Conference Programme, From Moral Treatment to Psychological Therapies: Psychotherapeutics from the York Retreat to the Present Day

A conference bringing together historians, psychotherapists, psychiatrists and anthropologists to discuss the development of psychotherapeutics in their social, intellectual and political contexts from the 18th C to the present day. Enquiries should be directed to sarah.marks@ucl.ac.uk

University College London, 11th-13th October 2013

Conference Programme 

Friday 11th October

To register, please go to http://uclpsychotherapeuticsconference.eventbrite.co.uk/

10.30 Registration opens, Arts and Humanities Common Room, UCL Foster Court, Malet Place

11.00-11.30

Welcome address, Sarah Marks (University College London)

11.30-12.30

18th and 19th Centuries

Edward Brown (Brown University)

François Leuret:  Nineteenth Century Psychotherapist

Sharlene Walbaum (Quinnipiac University, Connecticut)

Moral Therapies Before the York Retreat: Work and Therapeutics in 18th C English and Scottish Asylums’

Andrea Korenjak (Paris-Lodron-University, Salzburg)

Music and “Moral Treatment”: Music as Therapeutic Medium in the 19th Century as Reflected by Present-Day Music Therapy Concepts

Lunch 12.30-14.00

14.00-14.45

Late 19th Century

Sarah Chaney (University College London)

The Action of the Imagination: Daniel Hack Tuke and Late Victorian Psychotherapeutics

 C. Bartolucci and G.P Lombardo (University of Rome Sapienza)

The renewal in the diagnosis and treatment of the abnormal subjects according to Enrico Morselli (1852-1929)

14.45-15.15 coffee break

15.15-16.15

Early-Mid 20th Century

Monika Ankele (University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf)

Occupational Therapy in Germany during the Weimar Period (1918-1933)

David Freis (European University Institute, Florence)

Subordination, Authority, Psychotherapy: Mental Hygiene and Politics in Interwar Vienna

Simon Taylor (Columbia University New York)

Between Philosophy and Psychotherapeutics: Existential Analysis and the Birth of Anxiety

16.30-17.30

Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis

Susan Lamb (McGill University)

Importing, Appropriating, and Condemning Psychoanalysis: Adolf Meyer’s Use of Psychotherapy and Psychoanalytic Technique at Johns Hopkins, 1913-1917

Felicity Callard (University of Durham)

The Consulting Room: Towards a Historical Geography of the Psychoanalytic Setting

Dee McQuillan (University College London)

James Strachey and the Usefulness of Psychoanalytic Technique

17.30 Conference Reception

Saturday 12th October

11.00-12.30

Therapeutics in the ‘60s and ‘70s

Peter Agulnik, Craig Fees, David Kennard, David Millard, & John Hall 

Harnessing personal experience in understanding the development of therapeutic communities and environments: an Oxford case history

Kateřina Lišková (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic)

Everything for the Couple: Sex Therapy in Czechoslovakia during Normalization

Matei Iagher (University College London)

Ronald Sandison and the Use of LSD in Psychotherapy

Jelena Martinovic (University of Lausanne)

Bootstrappers Seeking to Understand Creativity: Experimental Science, Psychiatry and Cybernetics (1960-1970)

12.30-14.00 lunch

14.00-14.30

Keynote Lecture: Susan Hogan (University of Derby)

The History of Art Therapy in Britain

14.30-15.15

Art Therapies

Imogen Wiltshire (University of Birmingham)

On the Historical Origins of British Art Therapy: Arthur Segal, Painting and German Modernism

Cristina Hanganu-Bresch (University of the Sciences, Philadelphia)

The Proof is in the Brush-Stroke: Diagnosing and Treating Psychiatric Patients through Art

15.15-15.45 coffee break

15.45-16.45

New Paradigms in Modern Psychotherapy

Sonu Shamdasani (University College London)

Notes on Wellbeing in 20th Century Psychotherapy

Sarah Marks (University College London)

Rediscovering Pavlov: The Creation of Behavioural Therapies in Postwar Britain

Rachel Rosner (Independent Scholar)

To Manualize Psychotherapy: Aaron T. Beck and the Creation of the Manualized Treatment Protocol

 

Sunday 13th October

11.00-12.30

Transcultural and Extra-European Contexts

Roland Littlewood (University College London)

Anthropological Approaches and Transcultural Psychiatry

Martin Liebscher (University College London)

Analytical Psychology in Tel Aviv in the ’30s: The Controversy between Erich Neumann and Max M. Stern.

Debjani Das (Vidyasagar University, West Bengal)Treatment of ‘Insane’ in the

Asylums of Bengal in the Nineteenth Century: Therapy or Affliction?

Yu-Chuan Wu (Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taiwan)

Psychotherapy at Home: Morita Therapy for Neurotic Disposition in Japan, 1919-1945

12.30-14.00 lunch

14.00-15.00

Concepts and Debates in Modern Psychotherapy

Stephanie Pache (University of Lausanne)

Feminist Therapy: How Feminism Shapes Psychotherapy

Ulrich Koch (Johns Hopkins University)

Cruel to be kind? The politics of professionalism and the controversies over therapists’ displays of emotions in the consulting room (ca. 1940-1980)

Andreas Sommer (University of Cambridge)

Discarnate Spirits as Pathogens and Cure in Modern Western Psychiatry

Conference end: 15.00

 

Public Seminar, 26th June 2013

The Possessions at Loudun: Their Significance in the History of the Science of Mind
Dr. Craig E. Stephenson (AGAP/CPA/CAPT/IAAP)
 
UCL Institute of the Americas, Room 105
51 Gordon Square
London WC1H
This seminar focuses on the seventeenth-century possessions at Loudun, France and presents how the events of this famous case played out at the time and how theorizing about possession and obsession changed over almost four centuries of writing about them. For instance, in his definition of demonism for the Schweizer Lexikon (1945) C. G. Jung referred to the debate about Loudun, as did Gilles de la Tourette, Michel Foucault, Michel de Certeau, and Jacques Lacan. Eventually, psychopathology co-opted the word ‘obsession’, stripped of its religious connotation, and left the word ‘possession’ outside medical discourse. Then, in 1992, the American Psychiatric Association attempted to introduce ‘possession’ into its diagnostic manual (DSM-IV) as a mental disorder. Revisiting the history of Loudun provides a means for situating the APA’s recent interest in possession within a medical and intellectual continuum.

Public seminar, 6pm 5th June 2013

Dr. Jelena Martinovic (Institut universitaire d’histoire de la médecine et de la santé publique, University of Lausanne), 6pm, 5th June 2013

Psychiatry and near-death (1960-1970)
The presentation discusses the factors explaining the emergence of the Near-Death Experience (NDE) as a research topic in the United States. The study of a key actor, the psychiatrist Russell Noyes, helps to demonstrate how the experience of near-death became clinically relevant through the work of psychiatrists and psychologists, and more generally to retrace the academic foundations of research on death during the 60s and 70s. Central to the presentation is the methodological question concerning the use of a research biography as a vector for historical analysis.
Note different Location:
South Wing G12 Council Room
Main building